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World historian William Hardy Wivez calls Eve's Seed "a powerful, learned and provocative work" that "is a radical revision of traditional visions of human history". Degler calls Eve's Seed a "revelation, engagingly and imaginatively written and Wilson both see Eve's Seed as a ground-breaking work that will change the way we see the human condition. A "real man" has been seen in most cultures as "notawoman. Which areas women are excluded from vary from culture to culture, McElvaine writes, but they have usually included the clergy, politics, the military, and most of the business world.

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Eives historian William Hardy McNeill calls Eve's Seed "a powerful, learned and provocative work" that "is a radical revision of traditional visions of human history". Degler calls Eve's Seed a "revelation, engagingly and imaginatively written and Wilson both see Eve's Seed as a ground-breaking work that will change the way we see the human condition. A "real man" has been seen in most cultures as "notawoman.

Which areas women are excluded from vary from culture to culture, McElvaine writes, but they have usually included the clergy, politics, the military, and most of the business world. Among McElvaine's contentions are that the invention of agriculture—which he believes was almost certainly accomplished by women, who were responsible for the provision of plant food in hunter-gatherer Yorkk the long-standing roles of the sexes and, over a period of time, devalued the traditional male roles, especially hunting.

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McElvaine begins the book by saying that if he had to sum up human history in a single sentence, it would be: "Hell hath no fury like a man devalued. It necessarily followed that the Ultimate Creative Power, God, must also be male. This prehistoric mistake has, McElvaine says, enormously influenced all of history.

Synopsis[ edit ] The following synopsis of some of the major points in Eve's Seed is based on information contained in the book's official wivez. Human life—and the situation of both sexes—was radically changed about 10, years ago by the invention of agriculture, which Yrok all likelihood was accomplished by women. McElvaine says that the development of methods for the intentional production of food animal herding as well as agriculture substantially devalued what men had traditionally done.

Hunting was no longer needed and defense against other species declined in importance as groups of humans settled in growing s in farming areas into gfaw predators ventured less frequently than their paths had crossed those of human hunter-gatherers. The loss of value in their traditional roles left men adrift, seeking new meaningful roles, and increasingly resentful of women.

This Seed Metaphor, which McElvaine calls "the Conception Misconception," has remained Yirk us throughout history and it continues to mislead us in profound ways down to the present. The woman-made world of agriculture had, paradoxically, become a man's world to a degree unprecedented in human existence. As McElvaine puts it: "Hell hath no fury like a man devalued.

The toxic fruit that grew from the Seed Metaphor, McElvaine says, was male monotheism. The combination of the belief that God or the god Ykrk is the ultimate creator is male with the notion that humans are created in God's image yielded the inescapable conclusion that men are closer than women to godly perfection. Now what had been an essentially horizontal division became a clearly vertical one: traits and values associated with women were not simply classified as improper for men, but as inferior.

The total subordination of women throughout recorded history, McElvaine argues, is but the first part of the devastating legacy of wived Neolithic backlash and the Seed Metaphor. Equally important has been the concomitant suppression in men of all values, ideas, and characteristics associated with women and so defined as inferior. The rest, he says, is history—pretty much all of it—and, the gains of women in recent decades notwithstanding, these legacies from mistaken Yorrk in the Neolithic Age continue to have enormous effects on us today.